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Trapper or hunter.
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dusty



Joined: 07 Apr 2004
Posts: 1413

PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BB, thought you were trying to hijack the thread #lol . Trapper, no doubt. Although I do love to hunt. As a matter of fact adding some traps to the kit might not be a bad idea. But that is fodder for another thread...dusty
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Toad Sticker



Joined: 10 Sep 2008
Posts: 556
Location: Blackswamp homestead in NW Ohio

PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I already am both so it doesn't matter.
But if I had to choose... a trapper is much more efficient.
TS
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stevelutah



Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Posts: 1041
Location: Utah

PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 8:20 am    Post subject: trapper Reply with quote

Well I would PREFER to hunt but Trapping is probably more efficient in meat provided vs calories expended. Since we are talking LT survival it would be interesting trying to trap deer and elk with big drags.
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Plainsman*



Joined: 03 May 2003
Posts: 149
Location: Fargo, ND, USA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 12, 2009 9:37 pm    Post subject: Skilled... Reply with quote

I'd rather be a "skilled" trapper as the question asks, because then I can be an "opportunistic" hunter. It would always be possible to shoot something that I happen upon as I'm checking the traplines! #wink

Also, one can be a "lousy" hunter and still be "lucky enough" to add to the larder once in a while yet rely on the traps as the primary means!
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bigbore442001



Joined: 20 Nov 2002
Posts: 5477
Location: The Nutmeg State

PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 5:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well. I will ad my opinion again to this civil discourse. Hunting can be a hit or miss situation. You can't be in all places at all times. Right now as it stands this looks like it will be a second season in a row without a deer. I had a real honey hole in Connecticut that was lost. That spot was basically a guaranteed fill of both rifle tags. No longer.

When I go to the club for the monthly meeting we're going to discuss the problem of a family of beaver who moved onto the property and now may have flooded a good five acres or more. I have my trapping certificate and can take care of the problem.

If I catch ten beaver that is a lot of meat . I can have a conibear do it's duty while I eat, sleep and work for money at my other vocation, so to speak. Bruce Hemmings, aka Buckshot trapper has or had a lot of information on trapping. He stated that during the Great Depression trappers were able to feed their families why many others went without. Something to think about.
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riverdog



Joined: 04 Sep 2004
Posts: 5304
Location: Midwest

PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On farm land beaver can be a headache. I didn't have traps. The DNR (we can kill anything that causes destruction of crops or cropland without permits) advised to trap or kill a large adult and the remaininng family would move on. I would sit on the creek bank within sight of the lodge in the evening and shoot the biggest beaver. It seemed to work. No more damage or sign that season. That, and peeing on their targeted trees..........really, it works.
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Carlos El Hombre



Joined: 26 Jan 2011
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems to me that a good skill set to study is the use of snares. You can carry a selection of locking braided steel snares in your bug out bag with out sacraficing much in the way of weight or room.
Carlos
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riverdog



Joined: 04 Sep 2004
Posts: 5304
Location: Midwest

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a spool of seven strand wire designed for making fishing leaders. I once tied fine wire leaders for fly fishing pike and musky.
It is perfect snare wire.
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vlad
Moderator


Joined: 16 Nov 2002
Posts: 2319
Location: East Texas

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The diehard resister/survivor needs 110 and 220 conibear
traps; a good 22LR rifle with scads of subsonic ammo, and
a rifle capable of 500 yard kills. In a static situation traps
bring home the bacon while you chop wood, work on the cabin,
work the garden etc.
In SERE one may have to suddenly unass the area. I'd
use very quiet 22 subsonic to harvest freeloaders at the bait.
Each kill provides a gut pile for bait.

http://www.survivalblog.com/2010/12/
four_letters_re_cooking_beans.html
..we also keep a couple 50# bags of black oil sunflower
seeds around as the Mrs. is an avid bird/wildlife watcher
............ our visitors include doves, squirrels, raccoons,
porcupines, and black bears. Easy protein, without
leaving the yard.
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Big Medicine



Joined: 08 Jun 2012
Posts: 251

PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2012 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
In an area where large and small game abound,


Only downside of trapping in a situation like that is you will not be able to harvest big game efficiently, if at all. Snaring deer is a mite tricky......if you have the means or the temperatures to preserve it, a big game animal offers a lot of chow for one kill.
I've eaten beaver.....not something I'd care to make a steady diet of.
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Coureur De Bois



Joined: 25 Dec 2013
Posts: 80
Location: Central Virginia

PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2015 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've eaten Beaver most of my adult life and properly prepared it outshines beef or venision
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Grey Wolf
Cantankerous Member


Joined: 23 Jan 2003
Posts: 5273
Location: Deceased

PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2015 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Woodsrunner, I agree that beaver is prime meat. Yu' can eben' make Chili out uf' them. Deer are not that hard to snare!! Yu' jes' need to have a large enuff' snare. Dango!! Yu' can eben' snare wild Hogs!! #mrgreen
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